Sustainability Report 2017

HUMAN RIGHTS 17. HUMAN RIGHTS The company shall disclose what measures, strategies and objectives for the company and its supply chain are being taken in order to ensure that human rights are being respected and to prevent forced and child labour, as well as any form of exploitation, throughout the world. Here, the report should also address the results of the measures, as well as any risks. Our aim is to respect human rights and the ILO core labour standards in our supply chain. Since 2010 all our suppliers have therefore had to sign our Quality Assuran- ce Agreement, which incorporates the sustainability criteria of the BSCI’s international sustainability stan- dard. In our core business, we collaborate with a manageable number of suppliers. These are exclusively German suppliers – in fact, these include grain mills and baked goods wholesale companies. As already specified in Criterion 4, the most important raw material for us as a baked goods manufacturer is flour, which constitutes approx. 80 % of the materials used in our goods. Through purchasing only from German grain mills, whereby the flour in turn comes mainly from German grain cultiva- tion, we are able to assess the environmental and social sustainability of this raw material very well. Most of the remaining ingredients, such as butter or spices, come from Germany or EU countries like Holland or Scandinavia. The strict German and European stan- dards for worker and human rights ensure a high level of social sustainability with our important suppliers. It is not yet possible for us to check the social and ecolo- gical conditions of their cultivation and further proces- sing for a small portion of baking ingredients procured from the global supply chain. Machines and technology are predominantly procured from EU countries like Switzerland, Holland or France. Here too, the strict social and ecological standards of the EU apply. An action plan for developing an ecologically fair procurement system was worked out in 2017. We want to begin the systematic assessment of our suppliers in accordance with social and ecological criteria from 2019 onwards. PERFORMANCE INDICATORS FOR CRITERION 17 Performance Indicator GRI SRS-412-3: Investment agreements checked regarding human rights aspects. The reporting organisation shall disclose the following information: a. Total number and percentage of the major invest- ment agreements and contracts that contain human rights clauses or that have been checked regarding human rights aspects. b. The definition used by the company for “major investment agreements”. In 2017, no investment agreements were concluded. Performance Indicator GRI SRS-412-1: Business premises inspected regarding human rights aspects. The repor- ting organisation shall disclose the following informa- tion: a. Total number and percentage of the business loca- tions where an inspection for observance of human rights or a human rights impact assessment has been carried out, broken down by country. Our only business locations are Bocholt and Drossdorf in Germany. Observance of human rights is therefore legally mandatory and is fulfilled 100%. Performance Indicator GRI SRS-414-1: Inspected regar- ding social aspects, new suppliers. The reporting orga- nisation shall disclose the following information: a. Percentage of new suppliers who have been assessed based on social criteria. 100 % of all new suppliers are scrutinised based on social criteria. A basic precondition for listing all suppliers, including new suppliers, is that they must provide information about themselves as well as sign the Quality Assurance Agreement, in which the supplier accepts the BSCI standards. The BSCI is an economic initiative for companies that are actively committed to improving working conditions in the global supply chain. The BSCI code of conduct is based on various international contracts for protecting human rights. Performance Indicator GRI SRS-414-2: Social effects on the supply chain. The reporting organisation shall disclose the following information: a. The number of suppliers who have been scrutinised for social effects. b. The number of suppliers at whom significant actual and potential negative social effects were ascertained. c. The significant and potential negative social effects ascertained in the supply chain. d. The percentage of suppliers at which significant actual and potential negative social effects were detected and improvements were agreed as a result of the assessment. e. The percentage of suppliers at which significant actual and potential negative social effects have been ascertained and as a result the business relationship has been terminated, as well as the reasons for this decision. Through signing a Quality Assurance Agreement, all our suppliers are obligated to comply with the BSCI criteria and thus to protect human rights. We do not know of any significant negative effects on human rights in the supply chain. No suppliers have been identified at which there were any significant negative social effects. Through procuring flour, our main raw material, from a manageable number of German grain mills, whereby the flour in turn comes mainly from German grain cultivation, we are also able to assess the social sustain- ability of this raw material very well. Most of the remaining ingredients, such as butter or spices, come from Germany or EU countries like Holland or Scandinavia, where strict social standards apply. Only in the case of a small portion of baking ingredients from the global supply chain is it not yet possible for us to check the social and ecological conditions of their cultivation and further processing. Society 46 47

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